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Watch on Youtube - [484//0] QA - Selecting Linux Kernel preemption model based on your CPU ↗


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Watch on Youtube - [477//0] Interpreting CPU Passmark Benchmarks - a systems architect perspective ↗

Linux Kernel /sysfs Interface ↗
Saturday' 14-May-2022
/sysfs is one of the most popular kernel to user-space interface which you can leverage to add an interface to your Kernel code such as Kernel modules, Kernel Device Drivers, etc. Although personally I prefer /proc interface than other alternatives such as /sysfs, ioctl() and so on for my personal Kernel modules/stack. So here is my detailed multi-episode Youtube video series on /sysfs Interface.

Linux Kernel Programming - Device Drivers ↗
Saturday' 13-Mar-2021
Watch detailed videos and read topics on Linux Kernel Programming - Device Drivers

Circular Ring Buffers Architecture - Linux Kernel - Device Drivers - Network Stack ↗
Saturday' 13-Mar-2021
A circular buffer, circular queue, cyclic buffer or ring buffer is a data structure is a fixed-size buffer as if it were connected end-to-end or can be a dynamic one if implemented via Linked Lists. This is a data-structure quite popularly used in many parts of Linux Kernel such as Device Drivers, especially Network Hardware drivers, Network Packet Buffer such as sk_buff and so on. We can use a Ring Buffer in user-space application programming too. These kind of buffers are more suited for holding steady stream of incoming data. For example Network Packets. If the buffer gets full, we can discard the oldest buffer elements (such as packets). And to avoid we can increase the buffer size. So circular ring buffers plays a major role especially in Network Appliances such as Routers, Firewalls, etc.

Linux Kernel Programming | with or without Kernel Modules | Device Drivers ↗
Saturday' 01-Jan-2022
When learning Linux Kernel programming, often I notice my students and viewers gets confused and they start with learning writing Linux Kernel modules. And so they develop the common misconception about Kernel Programming in general. They assume writing code in Linux Kernel means writing kernel modules. Which is absolutely not. Kernel modules are an optional choice and are part of Linux Kernel. But besides modules, Linux Kernel has lot of other mainstream code. Hence if anyone wants to be a Kernel Developer, you should be aware that sometimes you add new code via modules, sometimes without them. And if you ask me, I am not much in favor of writing Kernel modules. Instead in my code, I try to integrate and make them a part of Linux Kernel so that they all get initialized during boot time. Here is an extensive Youtube video of mine on Linux Kernel Programming, with and without Kernel Modules.

CUDA GPU Distributed Parallel Computing ↗
Saturday' 13-Mar-2021

TCP Link Bonding vs Multipath TCP (MPTCP) ↗
Saturday' 13-Mar-2021

TCP vs UDP an Expert Opinion ↗
Saturday' 01-Jan-2022

Linux user-space - Shared Memory IPC - Live Demo and Example ↗
Saturday' 13-Mar-2021

Nmap Network Scanning ↗
Saturday' 13-Mar-2021

Building my own Userspace Network Stack - Platform/OS and Hardware Independent ↗
Saturday' 13-Mar-2021


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Watch on Youtube - [480//0] Linux Week | FAQ | OpenZFS | Linux 5.10-rc6 | FreeBSD | Raspberry Pi | Ep 1 | W1-Dec-2020 #News ↗

Networking and Q&A ↗
Saturday' 13-Mar-2021



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